Large Hadron Collider (LHC) do CERN

Luis França

Nimbostratus
Registo
23 Mai 2006
Mensagens
1,467
Local
Hades
061229_lhc_hmed_6p.jpg
 

Vince

Furacão
Registo
23 Jan 2007
Mensagens
10,624
Local
Braga
Re: Experiência controversa no CERN (LHC)

As explicações do CERN para os receios infundados:

Safety at the LHC

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can achieve energies that no other particle accelerators have reached before. The energy of its particle collisions has previously only been found in Nature. And it is only by using such a powerful machine that phyicists can probe deeper into the key mysteries of the Universe. Some people have expressed concerns about the safety of whatever may be created in high-energy particle collisions. However there are no reasons for concern.


Modest by Nature's standards

Accelerators recreate the natural phenomena of cosmic rays under controlled laboratory conditions. Cosmic rays are particles produced in outer space in events such as supernovae or the formation of black holes, during which they can be accelerated to energies far exceeding those of the LHC. Cosmic rays travel throughout the Universe, and have been bombarding the Earth's atmosphere continually since its formation 4.5 billion years ago. Despite the impressive power of the LHC in comparison with other accelerators, the energies produced in its collisions are greatly exceeded by those found in some cosmic rays. Since the much higher-energy collisions provided by Nature for billions of years have not harmed the Earth, there is no reason to think that any phenomenon produced by the LHC will do so.

Cosmic rays also collide with the Moon, Jupiter, the Sun and other astronomical bodies. The total number of these collisions is huge compared to what is expected at the LHC. The fact that planets and stars remain intact strengthens our confidence that LHC collisions are safe. The LHC's energy, although powerful for an accelerator, is modest by Nature's standards.


TGVs and mosquitoes

The total energy in each beam of protons in the LHC is equivalent to a 400 tonne train (like the French TGV) travelling at 150 km/h. However, only an infinitesimal part of this energy is released in each particle collision - roughly equivalent to the energy of a dozen flying mosquitoes. In fact, whenever you try to swat a mosquito by clapping your hands together, you create a collision energy much higher than the protons inside the LHC. The LHC's speciality is its impressive ability to concentrate this collision energy into a minuscule area on a subatomic scale. But even this capability is just a pale shadow of what Nature achieves routinely in cosmic-ray collisions.

During part of its operation, the LHC will collide beams of lead nuclei, which have a greater collision energy, equivalent to just over a thousand mosquitoes. However, this will be much more spread out than the energy produced in the proton collisions, and also presents no risk.


Microscopic black holes will not eat you...

Massive black holes are created in the Universe by the collapse of massive stars, which contain enormous amounts of gravitational energy that pulls in surrounding matter. The gravitational pull of a black hole is related to the amount of matter or energy it contains – the less there is, the weaker the pull. Some physicists suggest that microscopic black holes could be produced in the collisions at the LHC. However, these would only be created with the energies of the colliding particles (equivalent to the energies of mosquitoes), so no microscopic black holes produced inside the LHC could generate a strong enough gravitational force to pull in surrounding matter.

If the LHC can produce microscopic black holes, cosmic rays of much higher energies would already have produced many more. Since the Earth is still here, there is no reason to believe that collisions inside the LHC are harmful.

Black holes lose matter through the emission of energy via a process discovered by Stephen Hawking. Any black hole that cannot attract matter, such as those that might be produced at the LHC, will shrink, evaporate and disappear. The smaller the black hole, the faster it vanishes. If microscopic black holes were to be found at the LHC, they would exist only for a fleeting moment. They would be so short-lived that the only way they could be detected would be by detecting the products of their decay.


...nor will strangelets

Strangelets are hypothetical small pieces of matter whose existence has never been proven. They would be made of 'strange quarks' – heavier and unstable relatives of the basic quarks that make up stable matter. Even if strangelets do exist, they would be unstable. Furthermore, their electromagnetic charge would repel normal matter, and instead of combining with stable substances they would simply decay. If strangelets were produced at the LHC, they would not wreak havoc. If they exist, they would already have been created by high-energy cosmic rays, with no harmful consequences.

Reports and reviews

Studies into the safety of high-energy collisions inside particle accelerators have been conducted in both Europe and the United States by physicists who are not themselves involved in experiments at the LHC. Their analyses have been reviewed by the expert scientific community, which agrees with their conclusion that particle collisions in accelerators are safe. CERN has mandated a group of particle physicists, also not involved in the LHC experiments, to monitor the latest speculations about LHC collisions; this group may be contacted at lsag@cern.ch.

http://public.web.cern.ch/public/en/LHC/Safety-en.html


Facts and figures
The largest machine in the world...

The precise circumference of the LHC accelerator is 26 659 m, with a total of 9300 magnets inside. Not only is the LHC the world’s largest particle accelerator, just one-eighth of its cryogenic distribution system would qualify as the world’s largest fridge. All the magnets will be pre‑cooled to -193.2°C (80 K) using 10 080 tonnes of liquid nitrogen, before they are filled with nearly 60 tonnes of liquid helium to bring them down to -271.3°C (1.9 K).
The fastest racetrack on the planet...

At full power, trillions of protons will race around the LHC accelerator ring 11 245 times a second, travelling at 99.99% the speed of light. Two beams of protons will each travel at a maximum energy of 7 TeV (tera-electronvolt), corresponding to head-to-head collisions of 14 TeV. Altogether some 600 million collisions will take place every second.
The emptiest space in the Solar System...

To avoid colliding with gas molecules inside the accelerator, the beams of particles travel in an ultra-high vacuum – a cavity as empty as interplanetary space. The internal pressure of the LHC is 10-13 atm, ten times less than the pressure on the Moon!
The hottest spots in the galaxy, but even colder than outer space...

The LHC is a machine of extreme hot and cold. When two beams of protons collide, they will generate temperatures more than 100 000 times hotter than the heart of the Sun, concentrated within a minuscule space. By contrast, the 'cryogenic distribution system', which circulates superfluid helium around the accelerator ring, keeps the LHC at a super cool temperature of -271.3°C (1.9 K) – even colder than outer space!
The biggest and most sophisticated detectors ever built...

To sample and record the results of up to 600 million proton collisions per second, physicists and engineers have built gargantuan devices that measure particles with micron precision. The LHC's detectors have sophisticated electronic trigger systems that precisely measure the passage time of a particle to accuracies in the region of a few billionths of a second. The trigger system also registers the location of the particles to millionths of a metre. This incredibly quick and precise response is essential for ensuring that the particle recorded in successive layers of a detector is one and the same.
The most powerful supercomputer system in the world...

The data recorded by each of the big experiments at the LHC will fill around 100 000 dual layer DVDs every year. To allow the thousands of scientists scattered around the globe to collaborate on the analysis over the next 15 years (the estimated lifetime of the LHC), tens of thousands of computers located around the world are being harnessed in a distributed computing network called the Grid.
The ultimate guide to the LHC

Cover of the LHC guideMore information, facts and figures on the LHC can be found in CERN FAQ – LHC the guide.

http://public.web.cern.ch/public/en/LHC/Facts-en.html
 

Paulo H

Cumulonimbus
Registo
2 Jan 2008
Mensagens
3,159
Local
Castelo Branco 386m(489/366m)
Re: Experiência controversa no CERN (LHC)

Se bem entendi as explicações, a probabilidade do micro-buraco negro perdurar é ínfima e sem consequências relevantes.

Em todo o caso seria mais seguro fazê-lo no espaço, onde a densidade de matéria é menor (~vácuo), pois a segurança é que o buraco negro será tão minusculo que a sua força de atração seria insuficiente para que este "engordasse" continuamente, dada a proximidade das particulas envolventes (se pensarmos que a acção da sua influência seria inversamente proporcional ao quadrado da distância ~-1/r2). Mas há sempre o risco de "engordar" e de ir incrementando a sua micro-força "destrutiva"!

A outra segurança, trata de abordar a existência deste micro-buraco negro como que de uma equação química se tratasse: 2H2+O2= 2H20+Energia, em que a equação é reversível!! Isto é, assim que se reunam as condições (ingredientes+energia), seria tão rápido formar o buraco-negro como este decair para o outro lado da equação libertando a sua energia.

Digo isto, porque seria no mínimo intrigante que um buraco negro solitário "encolha" continuamente até se "evaporar".. Mesmo sendo dito por alguém como Stephen Hawking , que muito admiro! Acredito que as coisas não evaporem (no sentido de deixarem de existir), apenas voltam ao que eram antes ou se transformam em algo diferente.
 

Vince

Furacão
Registo
23 Jan 2007
Mensagens
10,624
Local
Braga
Re: Experiência controversa no CERN (LHC)

O Phil Plait do BadAstronomy.com foi convidado a visitar o LHC e fez um pequeno video.
Pelo video dá para perceber um pouco a enormidade do LHC.


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXjR-Jkrsvg"]YouTube - Trip to the Large Hadron Collider[/ame]



E um video sobre o Detector ATLAS

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-nmH1p8FFo"]YouTube - Construction of the ATLAS Detector.[/ame]
 

Vince

Furacão
Registo
23 Jan 2007
Mensagens
10,624
Local
Braga
Re: Experiência controversa no CERN (LHC)

Um texto mais aprofundado sobre a segurança do LHC:

Review of the Safety of LHC Collisions
Authors: J. Ellis, G. Giudice, M.L. Mangano, I. Tkachev, U. Wiedemann
(Submitted on 20 Jun 2008)

The safety of collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was studied in 2003 by the LHC Safety Study Group, who concluded that they presented no danger. Here we review their 2003 analysis in light of additional experimental results and theoretical understanding, which enable us to confirm, update and extend the conclusions of the LHC Safety Study Group. The LHC reproduces in the laboratory, under controlled conditions, collisions at centre-of-mass energies less than those reached in the atmosphere by some of the cosmic rays that have been bombarding the Earth for billions of years. We recall the rates for the collisions of cosmic rays with the Earth, Sun, neutron stars, white dwarfs and other astronomical bodies at energies higher than the LHC. The stability of astronomical bodies indicates that such collisions cannot be dangerous. Specifically, we study the possible production at the LHC of hypothetical objects such as vacuum bubbles, magnetic monopoles, microscopic black holes and strangelets, and find no associated risks. Any microscopic black holes produced at the LHC are expected to decay by Hawking radiation before they reach the detector walls. If some microscopic black holes were stable, those produced by cosmic rays would be stopped inside the Earth or other astronomical bodies. The stability of astronomical bodies constrains strongly the possible rate of accretion by any such microscopic black holes, so that they present no conceivable danger. In the case of strangelets, the good agreement of measurements of particle production at RHIC with simple thermodynamic models constrains severely the production of strangelets in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC, which also present no danger.

continua em: http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/0806/0806.3414.pdf (PDF)
 

Pico

Cirrus
Registo
5 Jun 2008
Mensagens
45
Local
Açores
Re: Experiência controversa no CERN (LHC)

Bom mais uma daquelas noticias infundadas dos media
ouviram falar em micro buracos-negros e ja pensão em o mundo ser engolido por um buraco negro....
realmente é triste quando as noticias são assim
 

Mário Barros

Furacão
Registo
18 Nov 2006
Mensagens
12,501
Local
Cavaleira (Sintra)
Local mais frio do mundo fica na fronteira franco-suíça

Um túnel debaixo da fronteira entre a França e a Suíça esconde o local mais frio do mundo e brevemente do Universo. No laboratório europeu já foram ultrapassados os 271 graus negativos, abaixo da temperatura no Espaço Profundo

É um anel de 27 kms, dentro de um túnel gigante entre a França e a Suíça. O Large Hadron Collider (LHC), um 'colisionador' de partículas do Laboratório Europeu tem estado a baixar a temperatura através de ímans e hélio líquido.

Resultado: 271 graus negativos, 456 Fahrenheit, 1,9 Kelvin para os cientistas; que transformaram já o laboratório no local mais frio do mundo e um dos mais gelados de todo o Universo. O próprio Espaço Exterior fica um grau (-270º) acima deste laboratório.

O objectivo é criar um novo big bang, controlado. Quando estiver totalmente operacional, os cientistas pretendem disparar dois raios pelo interior do LHC, em direcções opostas, que terão vários obstáculos pelo caminho.

Espera-se que o impacto cataclísmico nesses obstáculos possa criar novas partículas, até agora inexistentes, que 'recriem' e demonstrem como se processou a explosão inicial conhecida como Big Bang que terá criado o cosmos.

Existem oito sectores do LHC e neste momento, seis deles estão entre 4,5 e os almejados 1,9 Kelvin. Mas o facto de todos os oito sectores já terem atingido essa temperatura a dada altura nos últimos meses, tranquiliza os cientistas no sucesso da experiência.

Quando for ligado, o LHC vai trabalhar a uma potência de cinco triliões de electrovolts. Se tudo correr bem, será então desligado durante o Inverno e no próximo ano repetem a experiência a sete triliões de electro-volts.

In: Sol

Isto não é relativo aquela história da possivel formação de um buraco negro ?? :huh:
 

Paulo H

Cumulonimbus
Registo
2 Jan 2008
Mensagens
3,159
Local
Castelo Branco 386m(489/366m)
Ecobcg, não vai haver nenhum buraco negro.:thumbsup:

Tenho quase a certeza, mas pelo sim, pelo não, vou deixar o euromilhões para apostar noutro dia.

Assim se amanhã nos aparecer algum buraco negro, ao menos não terei gasto o dinheiro em vão!:lmao:
 

vitamos

Staff
Registo
11 Dez 2007
Mensagens
5,433
Local
Estarreja
A máquina de regressar ao Big Bang

Sucesso na primeira tentativa de funcionamento do maior acelerador do mundo

A primeira tentativa de fazer circular um feixe de milhões de protões no acelerador LHC, o mais potente do mundo, começou às 08h30 de Lisboa (07h30 GMT), no Laboratório Europeu de Física de Partículas (CERN).

Minutos depois efectuou-se uma segunda tentativa de injectar protões, informaram responsáveis do CERN.

O objectivo hoje é conseguir que as partículas dêem uma volta completa ao enorme túnel de 27 quilómetros que constitui o Grande Acelerador de Hadrões (LHC na sigla inglesa), antes de realizar experiências com colisões de protões, para tentar identificar novas partículas elementares.

A evolução dos acontecimentos hoje é, no entanto, desconhecida, reconheceu numa conferência de imprensa Lyn Evans, director do projecto do LHC.

"Não sabemos de quanto tempo vamos precisar" para conseguir que circulem os protões de forma estável, disse.

O primeiro lançamento de partículas até ao acelerador fez-se no sentido das agulhas do relógio, explicou Evans.

"Vamos confirmando que cada um dos elementos da máquina funciona, um por um", acrescentou.

De qualquer forma, hoje não se farão lançamentos em sentidos opostos, pelo que não se produzirão colisões de partículas.

Depois desta primeira tentativa saber-se-á se o maior acelerador de partículas do mundo funciona, mas os primeiros choques de protões apenas se produzirão daqui a alguns meses, altura em que se iniciará a obtenção de dados.

Experiência científica do século

O LCH, um projecto faraónico que juntou milhares de cientistas do mundo durante 20 anos, procura simular os primeiros milésimos de segundo do Universo, há cerca de 13,7 mil milhões de anos atrás, e é considerado a experiência científica do século.

Desde 1996, o CERN construiu a 100 metros debaixo da terra, perto de Genebra, na Suiça, um anel de 27 quilómetros de circunferência, refrigerada durante dois anos para atingir 271,3º Celsius.

À volta deste anel estão instalados quatro grandes detectores, no interior dos quais vão produzir-se colisões de protões numa velocidade próxima da da luz.

Em plena força, 600 milhões de colisões por segundo irão gerar uma floração de partículas tal como aconteceu no início do mundo, algumas das quais nunca puderam ser observadas.

No entanto, só daqui a alguns meses, quando se comprovar a evolução do funcionamento, é que haverá colisões de partículas e estarão criadas as condições para o estudo de novos fenómenos, através da recriação das condições que se produziram instantes depois do Big Bang.

O objectivo final desta grande experiência é poder dar resposta a muitas perguntas sobre a origem do Universo, entender por que a matéria é muito mais abundante no Universo do que a anti-matéria, e chegar a descobertas que "mudarão profundamente a nossa visão do Universo", segundo o director do CERN, Robert Aymar.

Uma das aspirações dos cientistas é encontrar o hipotético bosão de Higgs, uma partícula que nunca foi detectada com os aceleradores existentes, muito menos potentes que o LHC.



In Publico online
 

Mário Barros

Furacão
Registo
18 Nov 2006
Mensagens
12,501
Local
Cavaleira (Sintra)
Ui ui tá visto que o pessoal do apocalipse rotativo já pode sair do buraco, porque a experiência correu bem :thumbsup:

Continuo a achar que seria mais barato perguntar como é que tudo isto começou (origem do universo) aos moços lá debaixo, mas pronto, o orgulho humano dá nisto.
 

*Dave*

Nimbostratus
Registo
29 Jun 2008
Mensagens
1,912
Local
ASM (Idanha-a-Nova) - Covilhã
Re: Experiência controversa no CERN (LHC)

Acredito que as coisas não evaporem (no sentido de deixarem de existir), apenas voltam ao que eram antes ou se transformam em algo diferente.

Alguém uma vez disse "nada se perde, nada se ganha, tudo se transforma", esse alguém chamava-se Lavoisier e até era capaz de ter razão ;)
 

Paulo H

Cumulonimbus
Registo
2 Jan 2008
Mensagens
3,159
Local
Castelo Branco 386m(489/366m)
Desde 1996, o CERN construiu a 100 metros debaixo da terra, perto de Genebra, na Suiça, um anel de 27 quilómetros de circunferência, refrigerada durante dois anos para atingir 271,3º Celsius.



In Publico online

Humm.. Não será -271.3ºC?! Ou seja, 273.15-271.3 = 1.85K para assegurar a supercondutividade, fazendo-se refrigerar um circuito preenchido com hidrogénio ou hélio no estado líquido?!

Cheira-me a mais um tesourinho deprimente, desta vez do Publico Online!